6 things a sex therapist wishes you knew

22 05 2018

Here’s an article I did for Prima magazine a couple of years ago, but omitted to post on here at the time:

6 Things A Sex Therapist Wishes You Knew

My 6 tips were as follows:

1. It’s good to talk about sex!
Lots of clients still feel like opening up about their sex lives is a real taboo, and that sexual thoughts should be kept private and hidden away. But the truth is that sex is a huge part of who we are – it plays a vital role in determining our identities, and in shaping the relationships we choose throughout our lives – so it’s good to talk about it, and there’s nothing shameful or degrading about doing so.

You might not think that your sexual thoughts are relevant to certain other issues in your life, but sometimes sharing these inner desires can really shine a light on something else that’s seemingly unconnected.

sex

2. …but don’t JUST talk about sex
Sex is often the symptom, not the cause. Lots of people come to therapy looking to resolve a sexual issue, and often there’s a temptation to focus on that issue and not talk about anything else. But as you explore around the problem, you tend to find that what’s being played out in the bedroom is often related to other thoughts and feelings.

Even something as innocuous as moving house or changing job can have an unexpected impact on libido, as attention and energy levels are focused elsewhere. So it’s really important to get the full picture of what’s going on.

3. There’s nothing you could say that would surprise your therapist
People go to therapy for all kinds of sexual issues. This might be a question of their own orientation, making sense of a certain fetish, or exploring some kind of dysfunction, which they feel is preventing them from having the sex life they truly desire.

No matter how embarrassed you might feel about a certain sex-related issue, your therapist won’t judge you for it, and will remain calm and impartial as you explore the problem. Sexual issues are very common reasons for people to seek therapy, so your therapist has most likely heard it all before; and however filthy or unusual you might think your kink is, someone else has probably already shared it.

4. The biggest sexual organ is the brain
People spend so much time focusing on genitals, but often forget about the brain. Sex is a deeply psychological process, and one person’s turn ons can be another’s turn offs. This is because we all get aroused by different sensory stimuli, and have a different set of positive and negative associations for all kinds of situations and events; often relating back to previous experiences.

You can have a lot of fun with your body, but truly great sex needs to involve the brain as well. After all, it’s the brain that gets flooded with a magical cocktail of chemicals – dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin and endorphins – at the point of orgasm, to produce an almost trance-like experience.

sexybrain

5. Sex means different things to different people, at different times
There’s no single definition of a good sex life. Sexuality is fluid, and needs and desires can change drastically from person to person, and even day to day. For example, at the start of a relationship sex is usually about pleasure and passion, but over time it can become more about intimacy and connection, and then if a couple decide to have children it can suddenly become quite outcome-focused.

Sometimes people struggle to cope with these transitions, or may find that their own needs don’t match with their partners’, and this is why talking about sex is so important in relationships.

6. Don’t put it off
If you do have a sex-related worry or concern, it’s best to talk about it as soon as possible. If you don’t feel comfortable discussing it with a family member or a friend or partner, then seek out a good therapist to explore the issue with you. The longer you wait, the more it becomes likely that you build the issue up in your head, or start to complicate it even further.

It’s always best to tackle issues, rather than to let them fester or be ignored. More than ever, people are talking openly about their sexual orientations and desires, so there’s no need to deal with your worries alone. Everyone deserves to feel sexually fulfilled, and that includes you.

I specialise in sex and relationship issues, so if you would like to discuss any of these in a safe and secure environment, either individually or as part of a couple of family, then please contact me and I will schedule a session for you.

Advertisements




The internet, relationships, and the benefits of having a tech-savvy therapist.

15 04 2011

Although researchers continue to constantly explore the myriad of ways in which modern technology impacts our mental health, many mental health professionals still seem uncertain as to how to broach this subject or incorporate it into their clinical practice with clients. Increasingly, it is vital that counsellors stay up to date with the latest technological developments and gadgetry, so that they can be aware of the effects these may have on their clients and their relationships.

As a modern, systemic psychotherapist, I like to think of myself as pretty ‘tech-savvy’ too. I am consistently aware of the possible role technology might play in the lives of my clients. Be it smartphones, Android devices or iPads, technology has significantly changed the ways in which we interact with one another, and also shifted the boundaries of sexuality and intimacy. Explicit sexual materials are easily accessible online, and ‘digital infidelity’ and porn addiction are now problems in many marriages.  ‘Emotional infidelity’ is also becoming more and more common, as people explore intimate secrets which might have, in the past, been reserved for face-to-face time with their partner – or remained undiscovered altogether – through sexts, forums, chatrooms and webcams, with relative strangers. This article in the Huffington Post even goes so far as to suggest that modern couples should change their wedding vows to “until Facebook do us part”.

Similarly, this viral YouTube video suggests that Facebook may contribute to rising levels of depression, as it encourages us to constantly compare ourselves to others, or become competitive with people we barely even know (it’s somewhat ironic that the video spread so well across Facebook itself, though).

Furthermore, this recent story on USA Today suggests that social media websites can be bad for our children, too; exposing them to cyberbullying, depression, and inappropriate content (although Facebook has recently added a ‘suicide-alert’ utility to help identify those who may be at risk).

So, if this is the case, we don’t we all just shut off our computers for good?

Well, the answer is simple: the internet has a lot of advantages, too. It can be an incredibly unifying place for many people, not only as a great networking tool for businesses, but also a hub of infinite connections across the world. More and more of us meet our partners online; either through shared interests, online communities, role-playing games, or the plethora of dating sites which promise to help us find our perfect match if we just answer a few simple questions. Forums, chatrooms, memes and viral videos can help to create a sense of community, particularly for those of us who may not be able to find it elsewhere. If we’re seeking advice, information, or like-minded people, the internet offers us a unique opportunity to feel connected to others, no matter how far away they might be geographically. Social networking ensures that we all feel more connected than ever, to our colleagues, our acquaintances, and even our favourite celebrity Tweeters. And text messages, emails, Facebook and Skype all ensure that we need never lose touch with our friends and loved ones.

A lot of this is often overlooked, as it is easy to just point the finger and blame technology for modern woes, and remember the mythical ‘good old days’ when everything seemed so much simpler.

I believe that we should all keep our computers running,  and that the internet holds a lot of benefits for us all, both as individuals, couples, and families, as long as we remember to invest plenty of time and effort in our real lives and face-to-face relationships, too. Ultimately it is those that are the most rewarding and the most important. I believe that ‘everything in moderation’ is a healthy motto, and that the internet can be a great source of fun, facts, and friendship, as long we don’t let it turn into an addiction or an obsession.

In addition, I’ve had many clients roll their eyes wearily when I suggested they keep a paper journal or write something down, only to see them light up with excitement when I recommend using an online journal or creative writing website instead. It’s just a fact that the keyboard is sometimes easier to fit into our daily lives that the old fashioned pad of paper.

So, if you’re a client looking to see a therapist, don’t overlook the benefits of having a tech-savvy counsellor. I’m not saying it’s a necessity by any means – in fact, it shouldn’t really matter, if your therapist is good at what they do – but it can be nice to have a counsellor who knows the ins and outs of your situation and can really relate to what you’re talking about; particularly if the issue you want to discuss is directly connected with technology or the internet.