Private Practice Made Simple

4 02 2012

My review of “Private Practice Made Simple” by Randy J. Paterson, PhD:

Private Practice Made Simple front cover

There are plenty of books and websites out there offering advice to mental health professionals who want to know how to establish their own private practice. With this new release Randy J. Paterson, PhD offers his own comprehensive take on this popular topic, promising to provide “everything you need to know to set up and manage a successful mental health practice,” from “getting client referrals and creating a positive and comfortable office atmosphere to building a strong and thriving therapy practice that can serve both you and your clients.”

As the 2008 recipient of the Canadian Psychological Association’s Distinguished Practitioner Award, and the owner of a private multiple-provider outpatient practice in Vancouver, Paterson certainly seems to write with a wealth of personal experience in this area. Indeed, what differentiates this book from so many of the others available on the market is that personal touch, as Paterson shares his own journey into private practice, and the lessons learned along the way, explaining that:

No one really teaches you how to manage a mental health or counseling practice. As clinicians we stumble through our careers, gradually picking up shortcuts and strategies that make our lives (or those of our clients) a lot easier. Many of these useful ideas aren’t rocket science and could have been taught to us in an afternoon if anyone had thought about it. That’s what this book is for: it’s nothing more than a collection of useful basic tips … The emphasis of the book is on quick and easy strategies that can save a lot of headaches.

This light, conversational style typifies Paterson’s everyman approach to the topic, ensuring that the book is easy to read and full of accessible ideas for anyone contemplating the possibility of working in private practice.

While some other books might launch straight into the practical side of running a private practice, Paterson predicates this by starting his book with a chapter focusing on the importance of weighing up the pros and cons of running this kind of business in the first place. Paterson lists his ten most frequently-heard arguments both for and against private practice, and I can guarantee that any mental health professional will be able to relate to at least some of this debate.

The arguments in favor are listed as:

1. No Big-Organization Hassles
2. Getting Away from the Medical Model of Distress
3. Increased Accessibility for Clients
4. You Get to See Whom You Want
5. More Money
6. Supplement Your Salaried Income
7. Flexible Hours and Holidays
8. Work Fewer Hours
9. No Commute!
10. A Service Based on Your Own Vision

Whilst the arguments against are:

1. You’ll Never Get Clients
2. You’re No Good at Networking or Marketing
3. Uncertainty About Income from Month to Month
4. You Hate All the Clerical and Business Demands
5. You Don’t Know Enough to Practice Independently
6. Dealing with Fees will be a Huge Hassle
7. You’ll be Helpless in the Face of Insurers or Funders
8. No Retirement Plan or Benefits
9. You’ll Burn Out and Won’t Have a Safety Net
10. You Won’t have a Sense of Meaning in Your Work

Paterson follows this up with a considered appraisal of what is truly involved in the day-to-day running of a successful private practice, and then allows you to make up your own mind as to whether you’re really suited to this type of business. Assuming that you are, this book then serves as a comprehensive guide to everything involved in setting up and maintaining your practice, from such subtle nuances as the ‘olfactory environment’ and placement of clocks, to website design and finance tips.

As Paterson says, many of the ideas in this book aren’t rocket science, and might initially just seem like common sense, but don’t let this be a deterrent. As you make your way through the book you’ll realize there are also countless suggestions here which will leave you wondering “Why didn’t I ever think of that before?” and feeling enlightened. One such example is the section on ‘The Client’s View,’where Paterson explains the importance of the contents of the therapist’s bookcase:

Look at your own bookshelf from the client’s position. Notice where your eye naturally falls. These are the most salient shelves. Banish books that imply you are having significant problems yourself (Avoiding Burnout, The Wounded Healer), your introductory psychology textbooks, the trashy novels you secretly read at lunch, the books on handling problem clients, the self-help books you wouldn’t recommend to your worst enemy, and all the books on managing the finances of your private practice (including this book). Shift those books upward or downward, and replace them with scholarly books on your specialty areas of practice, books on diversity, a book or two on sexuality (this subtly gives clients to put such issues on the table), the self-help books you most frequently recommend, high-level books on practice and therapy, and other books that communicate your expertise, interests, and breadth of knowledge.

Once you’ve thought about it this seems so obvious, but I have seen plenty of counseling rooms where this advice had clearly been sorely missed, and where business may have suffered as a result.

It is these kinds of subtle tips which can make a huge amount of difference to the way a private practice is run, and which might distinguish an outstanding business from a mediocre one. Having all of these ideas listed in one simple book is truly invaluable, and will surely offer numerous benefits to anyone in the mental health profession. I couldn’t think of anything which Paterson had missed from this book, and he even includes a link to free downloads of practice worksheets and sample forms to help you on your way. If you’ve ever considered setting up a private practice, or you’re running one already, then this book’s for you.

3 out of 5 stars.

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The internet, relationships, and the benefits of having a tech-savvy therapist.

15 04 2011

Although researchers continue to constantly explore the myriad of ways in which modern technology impacts our mental health, many mental health professionals still seem uncertain as to how to broach this subject or incorporate it into their clinical practice with clients. Increasingly, it is vital that counsellors stay up to date with the latest technological developments and gadgetry, so that they can be aware of the effects these may have on their clients and their relationships.

As a modern, systemic psychotherapist, I like to think of myself as pretty ‘tech-savvy’ too. I am consistently aware of the possible role technology might play in the lives of my clients. Be it smartphones, Android devices or iPads, technology has significantly changed the ways in which we interact with one another, and also shifted the boundaries of sexuality and intimacy. Explicit sexual materials are easily accessible online, and ‘digital infidelity’ and porn addiction are now problems in many marriages.  ‘Emotional infidelity’ is also becoming more and more common, as people explore intimate secrets which might have, in the past, been reserved for face-to-face time with their partner – or remained undiscovered altogether – through sexts, forums, chatrooms and webcams, with relative strangers. This article in the Huffington Post even goes so far as to suggest that modern couples should change their wedding vows to “until Facebook do us part”.

Similarly, this viral YouTube video suggests that Facebook may contribute to rising levels of depression, as it encourages us to constantly compare ourselves to others, or become competitive with people we barely even know (it’s somewhat ironic that the video spread so well across Facebook itself, though).

Furthermore, this recent story on USA Today suggests that social media websites can be bad for our children, too; exposing them to cyberbullying, depression, and inappropriate content (although Facebook has recently added a ‘suicide-alert’ utility to help identify those who may be at risk).

So, if this is the case, we don’t we all just shut off our computers for good?

Well, the answer is simple: the internet has a lot of advantages, too. It can be an incredibly unifying place for many people, not only as a great networking tool for businesses, but also a hub of infinite connections across the world. More and more of us meet our partners online; either through shared interests, online communities, role-playing games, or the plethora of dating sites which promise to help us find our perfect match if we just answer a few simple questions. Forums, chatrooms, memes and viral videos can help to create a sense of community, particularly for those of us who may not be able to find it elsewhere. If we’re seeking advice, information, or like-minded people, the internet offers us a unique opportunity to feel connected to others, no matter how far away they might be geographically. Social networking ensures that we all feel more connected than ever, to our colleagues, our acquaintances, and even our favourite celebrity Tweeters. And text messages, emails, Facebook and Skype all ensure that we need never lose touch with our friends and loved ones.

A lot of this is often overlooked, as it is easy to just point the finger and blame technology for modern woes, and remember the mythical ‘good old days’ when everything seemed so much simpler.

I believe that we should all keep our computers running,  and that the internet holds a lot of benefits for us all, both as individuals, couples, and families, as long as we remember to invest plenty of time and effort in our real lives and face-to-face relationships, too. Ultimately it is those that are the most rewarding and the most important. I believe that ‘everything in moderation’ is a healthy motto, and that the internet can be a great source of fun, facts, and friendship, as long we don’t let it turn into an addiction or an obsession.

In addition, I’ve had many clients roll their eyes wearily when I suggested they keep a paper journal or write something down, only to see them light up with excitement when I recommend using an online journal or creative writing website instead. It’s just a fact that the keyboard is sometimes easier to fit into our daily lives that the old fashioned pad of paper.

So, if you’re a client looking to see a therapist, don’t overlook the benefits of having a tech-savvy counsellor. I’m not saying it’s a necessity by any means – in fact, it shouldn’t really matter, if your therapist is good at what they do – but it can be nice to have a counsellor who knows the ins and outs of your situation and can really relate to what you’re talking about; particularly if the issue you want to discuss is directly connected with technology or the internet.