The internet, relationships, and the benefits of having a tech-savvy therapist.

15 04 2011

Although researchers continue to constantly explore the myriad of ways in which modern technology impacts our mental health, many mental health professionals still seem uncertain as to how to broach this subject or incorporate it into their clinical practice with clients. Increasingly, it is vital that counsellors stay up to date with the latest technological developments and gadgetry, so that they can be aware of the effects these may have on their clients and their relationships.

As a modern, systemic psychotherapist, I like to think of myself as pretty ‘tech-savvy’ too. I am consistently aware of the possible role technology might play in the lives of my clients. Be it smartphones, Android devices or iPads, technology has significantly changed the ways in which we interact with one another, and also shifted the boundaries of sexuality and intimacy. Explicit sexual materials are easily accessible online, and ‘digital infidelity’ and porn addiction are now problems in many marriages.  ‘Emotional infidelity’ is also becoming more and more common, as people explore intimate secrets which might have, in the past, been reserved for face-to-face time with their partner – or remained undiscovered altogether – through sexts, forums, chatrooms and webcams, with relative strangers. This article in the Huffington Post even goes so far as to suggest that modern couples should change their wedding vows to “until Facebook do us part”.

Similarly, this viral YouTube video suggests that Facebook may contribute to rising levels of depression, as it encourages us to constantly compare ourselves to others, or become competitive with people we barely even know (it’s somewhat ironic that the video spread so well across Facebook itself, though).

Furthermore, this recent story on USA Today suggests that social media websites can be bad for our children, too; exposing them to cyberbullying, depression, and inappropriate content (although Facebook has recently added a ‘suicide-alert’ utility to help identify those who may be at risk).

So, if this is the case, we don’t we all just shut off our computers for good?

Well, the answer is simple: the internet has a lot of advantages, too. It can be an incredibly unifying place for many people, not only as a great networking tool for businesses, but also a hub of infinite connections across the world. More and more of us meet our partners online; either through shared interests, online communities, role-playing games, or the plethora of dating sites which promise to help us find our perfect match if we just answer a few simple questions. Forums, chatrooms, memes and viral videos can help to create a sense of community, particularly for those of us who may not be able to find it elsewhere. If we’re seeking advice, information, or like-minded people, the internet offers us a unique opportunity to feel connected to others, no matter how far away they might be geographically. Social networking ensures that we all feel more connected than ever, to our colleagues, our acquaintances, and even our favourite celebrity Tweeters. And text messages, emails, Facebook and Skype all ensure that we need never lose touch with our friends and loved ones.

A lot of this is often overlooked, as it is easy to just point the finger and blame technology for modern woes, and remember the mythical ‘good old days’ when everything seemed so much simpler.

I believe that we should all keep our computers running,  and that the internet holds a lot of benefits for us all, both as individuals, couples, and families, as long as we remember to invest plenty of time and effort in our real lives and face-to-face relationships, too. Ultimately it is those that are the most rewarding and the most important. I believe that ‘everything in moderation’ is a healthy motto, and that the internet can be a great source of fun, facts, and friendship, as long we don’t let it turn into an addiction or an obsession.

In addition, I’ve had many clients roll their eyes wearily when I suggested they keep a paper journal or write something down, only to see them light up with excitement when I recommend using an online journal or creative writing website instead. It’s just a fact that the keyboard is sometimes easier to fit into our daily lives that the old fashioned pad of paper.

So, if you’re a client looking to see a therapist, don’t overlook the benefits of having a tech-savvy counsellor. I’m not saying it’s a necessity by any means – in fact, it shouldn’t really matter, if your therapist is good at what they do – but it can be nice to have a counsellor who knows the ins and outs of your situation and can really relate to what you’re talking about; particularly if the issue you want to discuss is directly connected with technology or the internet.

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